Zipnosis Team
Zipnosis Team

“Unfortunately, it’s taken some pretty extraordinary circumstances, but I think this will be a watershed moment for the industry,” Zipnosis CEO Jon Pearce told CNN Business. “Certainly in the past few weeks with Covid, I think people’s desire to have trusted advice from medical providers is just gone through the roof … and that’s what we can facilitate in a very fast fashion. And more importantly, we can facilitate that without leaving your home.”

Zipnosis, on the other hand, operates in what is known as asynchronous care — where the doctor and patient don’t need to be in the same place (even virtually) at the same time. The company, founded over a decade ago, has users fill out a virtual questionnaire through a chatbot-like tool that packages their responses for a doctor to review and diagnose. Zipnosis claims this can dramatically speed up the process, allowing doctors to make a diagnosis in an average of 89 seconds.

“Instead of talking to a doctor over video, you would answer a series of yes no questions,” Pearce said, “the same questions they would be asking you in real life when instead of doing that, we have a really smart computer system do it.

Telemedicine has its limitations — some complex diagnoses and treatment may require in-person interactions. If a patient appears particularly sick, telemedicine companies will recommend they go to a clinic or hospital. But the technology can play an important role in easing some of the initial load from walk-ins, particularly as the global pandemic places strain on the healthcare system and makes people nervous about being exposed to the virus.

“What’s happening is that people are worried,” said Ann Mond Johnson, CEO of the American Telemedicine Association, a non-profit organization focused on increasing the adoption of virtual health technologies. “People don’t know really what to do, where to go, whether or not they should get a test for the virus. And so the hospitals are really deeply concerned about managing exposure.”

Tags: industry

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