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The Virtual Care Insider

Do You Have to Sacrifice Clinical Quality for Convenience?

in Technology

Zipnosis Team

Zipnosis Team
June 10, 2016

People are busy these days. And making a trip to the doctor either eats into working hours or free time. That’s why patients are demanding alternatives to the ways they access care.

This demand has forced health systems to take a leap of faith and offer telemedicine services. Some of which are based on outsourced clinical support. But can health systems depend on outsourced telemedicine vendors to provide quality care that adheres to national best practices? Can patients be certain the diagnoses and treatments they receive are accurate and clinically adherent?

JAMA Study Finds Guideline Adherence in Live Video Visits Spotty

Capturing quality metrics for the telemedicine space has been tricky. But researchers at the University of California at San Francisco decided to try anyway. They evaluated the care provided by eight telemedicine vendors against national best practices. It should be noted that Zipnosis was not part of the study.

Results of this 2-year study were published in the May edition of JAMA Internal Medicine, and were not encouraging. Over the 599 virtual visits studied, adherence to national best practice protocols for care ranged from 34.4 to 66.1 percent. The variation range increased for treatment of viral pharyngitis and acute rhinosinusitis (sinusitis), with clinicians adhering to guidelines anywhere from 12.8 percent to 82.1 percent of the time.

So, what did all eight of the companies evaluated have in common? All were direct-to-consumer telemedicine providers that exclusively use synchronous – or live – video technology, apparently lacking the use of effective clinical decision support tools to ensure guideline adherence, to treat patients.

Convenience without Compromise

While the results of this study don’t bode well for outsourced and direct-to-consumer telemedicine vendors that rely primarily on video, high quality virtual care is within reach. An internal review of more than 1,700 asynchronous patient encounters through two major health systems for treatment of acute sinusitis on the Zipnosis platform had contrasting results to the JAMA study – a guideline adherence rate of 95 percent.

The backbone of this success is the adaptive online interview embedded within the Zipnosis platform, which guides patients through a structured interview grounded in evidence-based national best practices. Once the interview is complete, clinicians receive a comprehensive clinical note and are then guided through curated diagnosis and treatment options based on patient inputs – the final diagnosis is issued by a local provider, not an outsourced clinician.

The whole process leaves little room for error; harried clinicians won’t miss a question and organically designed clinical decision support means patients get the right care quickly and consistently. Best of all, since Zipnosis’ partners use their own clinicians, they can directly monitor and improve clinical quality without the hassle of working through a 3rd party clinical team.

Patients are demanding more convenient access to healthcare. The data is clear: Traditional, direct-to-consumer, outsourced telemedicine services that address patient convenience face challenges in the area of clinical quality. In the absence of a better alternative, this would be fine. But it is time to stop compromising and expect virtual care to improve access and quality at the same time. At least, that’s what we believe and are proving here at Zipnosis.  

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