COVID-19: The Largest Case Study on Async

The pandemic forced health systems to adopt more robust virtual care strategies, so telehealth and COVID-19 are closely linked. In many ways, the pandemic was the ultimate test for virtual care platforms — many of which were overwhelmed while providers using Zipnosis’ asynchronous telemedicine platform kept up with unprecedented demand. Let’s take a closer look at the data relating to asynchronous telehealth and COVID-19.

Telehealth and COVID-19 —
Part of our Asynchronous Care Guide

When we built this guide, we set out to create a single comprehensive resource for everything healthcare professionals will ever need to know about asynchronous telemedicine. It’s 29 pages of pure data, research, and the largest case study ever conducted on async. On this page, we’ll take a look at the research surrounding telehealth and COVID-19 to evaluate how asynchronous telemedicine stacks up against other forms of virtual care.

Looking for information on a specific topic? Use the buttons below to navigate to different sections of the guide.

PROBLEM: HEALTH SYSTEMS ARE OVERWHELMED

In the wake of COVID-19, hospitals, health systems, and private practices across the nation are feeling the strain of staffing shortages and provider burnout. While the pandemic is not the sole cause of the staffing crisis, it has significantly accelerated and amplified the situation. In less than two years, nearly half a million U.S. healthcare workers have left their jobs. One in five healthcare workers has left the industry, and another 30% of remaining workers have thought about leaving their jobs, according to a Becker’s Hospital Review article.

Unfortunately, the shortage won’t be over anytime soon. According to Mercer’s 2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis, the U.S. will be more than 3.2 million healthcare workers short in 2026. With more workers projected to permanently leave the industry than workers expected to join, nearly every state will be experiencing a labor shortage. 

On top of that, many health systems are dealing with another problem that was brought on by the pandemic: delayed and avoided care. More than a year after the pandemic began, the CDC says an estimated 41% of U.S. adults have delayed or avoided their own medical care. This can have severe consequences, including increased cost of care but more importantly, increased morbidity and mortality. 

provider burnout delayed avoided care
asynchronous telemedicine efficiency

second provider work time per visit

%

automation of administrative burden

SOLUTION: ASYNCHRONOUS TELEHEALTH AND COVID-19

These issues bring health systems to a crossroads. How can understaffed health systems keep up with patient demand and reacquire the patients who are avoiding or delaying their visits?

Health organizations that adopted asynchronous care for low acuity cases benefited greatly during the pandemic. Async allowed organizations to:
Divert non-urgent cases away from the emergency department
Drive suspected Covid positive patients to testing centers
Offload low acuity cases to async, converting one average in-person visit into 12 async visits

During the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak, we saw utilization increase as much as 3,600% — yet our health system partners and their providers were able to keep up. We saw a single physician use Zipnosis to complete 1,000 asynchronous telemedicine visits in a week, freeing up 250 hours of provider time for higher acuity patients. Organizations leveraging video for telehealth saw robust solutions offered by national brands fall over while wait times skyrocketed to 22 hours. Meanwhile, organizations using Zipnosis saw their average wait time increase by only one to ten minutes. 

Even when organizations are not managing an active public health crisis, asynchronous telemedicine is a force multiplier. The on-demand queue-based system offered by Zipnosis:
Diverts demand from waiting rooms and administrative staff
Increases provider efficiency by 10-12 fold
Removes 99% of administrative burden
Treats patients in less than 20 minutes — 3 minutes to set up an account, 7 minutes to fill out a protocol, 9 minutes to wait on a treatment plan from a provider

SOLUTION: ASYNCHRONOUS TELEHEALTH AND COVID-19

These issues bring health systems to a crossroads. How can understaffed health systems keep up with patient demand and reacquire the patients who are avoiding or delaying their visits?

Health organizations that adopted asynchronous care for low acuity cases benefited greatly during the pandemic. Async allowed organizations to:
• Divert non-urgent cases away from the emergency department
• Drive suspected Covid positive patients to testing centers
• Offload low acuity cases to async, converting one average in-person visit into 12 async visits

During the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak, we saw utilization increase as much as 3,600% — yet our health system partners and their providers were able to keep up. We saw a single physician use Zipnosis to complete 1,000 asynchronous telemedicine visits in a week, freeing up 250 hours of provider time for higher acuity patients. Organizations leveraging video for telehealth saw robust solutions offered by national brands fall over while wait times skyrocketed to 22 hours. Meanwhile, organizations using Zipnosis saw their average wait time increase by only one to ten minutes. 

asynchronous telemedicine efficiency

Even when organizations are not managing an active public health crisis, asynchronous telemedicine is a force multiplier. The on-demand queue-based system offered by Zipnosis:
• Diverts demand from waiting rooms and administrative staff
• Increases provider efficiency by 10-12 fold
• Removes 99% of administrative burden
• Treats patients in less than 20 minutes — 3 minutes to set up an account, 7 minutes to fill out a protocol, 9 minutes to wait on a treatment plan from a provider

second provider work time per visit

%

automation of administrative burden

Asynchronous Telemedicine Lets Providers Do What They Do Best: Provide Care.

It’s more than the robust virtual triaging and patient navigation capabilities. With asynchronous telemedicine, health systems can improve the experience for patients, reduce provider burnout, and give providers more time in their day to treat patients in-person.

With the clinical decision logic built-in, our asynchronous protocols recognize potential diagnoses for providers that fit the highest standard of evidence-based guidelines, simplifying the workflow for providers — resulting in less time spent on administrative work.

unique diagnoses treated through our asynchronous platform

faster for providers than an in-clinic visit

%

adherence to clinical guidelines

unique diagnoses treated through our asynchronous platform

faster for providers than an in-clinic visit

%

adherence to clinical guidelines

“We have to learn how to use asynchronous, which is really a force multiplier, in order to make sure those who need to be seen get seen.”


Eric Wallace, MD – Medical Director of Telehealth
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Want the complete study? Download our guide!

When we built this guide, we set out to create a single comprehensive resource for everything healthcare professionals will ever need to know about asynchronous telemedicine. It’s 29 pages of pure data, research, and the largest case study ever conducted on async.

Continue to another section, or download the full guide today.

We’re driving healthcare change with ideas and action.

Regulatory Roundup — August 2022

Regulatory Roundup — August 2022

Welcome to the newest edition of Regulatory Roundup! Each month, I review the latest legislation affecting the telehealth industry — at both federal and state levels. Let's dive in!Federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) — Released Roadmap for Ending...

read more
Regulatory Roundup – July 2022

Regulatory Roundup – July 2022

Interested in the latest legislation affecting the telehealth industry? You’ve come to the right place! Let's take a look at how regulations changed in July.  Federal US House Bill 4040 — Connecting Rural Telehealth to the Future Act — Passed  Introduced on June 22,...

read more